Jonathan Gibbs MBBRS MIBWRT (A.P) MAPHP

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Jonathan Gibbs

Jonathan is a Counsellor, Hypnotherapist and BrainWorking Recursive Therapy (BWRT®) Advanced Practitioner, dealing with mind-related issues. 


Jonathan has a background in teaching.  He worked as a Teacher of English as a Foreign language for four years in Japan – mostly in Hiroshima, and now teaches GCSE and A level Economics at both a local school and privately.  It was his interest in people and society that led to him getting a degree in Economics and later an MA in Social Anthropology. Jonathan qualified as a Counsellor in 2008.

Since moving to Essex in 2002, Jonathan has been a volunteer at several local organisations.  He has been a Samaritan volunteer and more recently has been a volunteer counsellor at Havens hospice.  Jonathan has also volunteered as a counsellor at Chelmsford and District Mind and has given talks on the benefits of Hypnotherapy at the Macmillan Cancer Support centre in Southend University Hospital.

You can find out more about Jonathan Gibbs here.


Q&A with Jonathan

Is it correct that you offer a free first session?

That’s absolutely correct.  The relationship between therapist and client is incredibly important – as both therapist and client have to feel comfortable working together to make changes.  The free initial consultation allows someone to meet me and see where I work, to tell me about what they want to change and for me to explain the various kinds of talking-therapies I offer.  

What are the typical issues that people come for help with?

This really is impossible to answer! We humans are social animals, so connection to others is essential to our well-being as well as our chances of survival – and clearly many issues revolve around relationships.  Humans also have a tendency to imagine other people think and feel like we do – but of course this isn’t always the case.  Added to this - our closeness to others throws up other issues – for example the grief we can feel with regard to the losses associated with bereavement and divorce.  I take a positive view however – that like our ancestors before us, we have within us all the resources we need to survive and indeed flourish.  People sometimes need assistance in finding these resources and making use of them.

Do you offer hypnotic gastric band technique for weight-loss?

I don’t offer this technique.  However, I do deal with such issues through a coaching approach that makes use of the techniques of BWRT® to allow for effective and lasting change.  Phrases such as ‘weight-loss’ are unfortunate as our mind has a tendency to look for things that we have ‘lost’.  Assisting a client to move to a more ‘healthy-weight’ is certainly a positive approach.

Are you a member of reputable professional organisations?

Yes – and it is important to find a therapist who is!  For a client it can seem a little overwhelming to have these all listed, and for a therapist it can feel pretentious to list all these, with their logos and the letters which they sometimes confer after one’s name.  Briefly then, I am a member of the Association for Professional Hypnosis and Psychotherapy, a registered member of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy, a member of the National Register of Psychotherapists and Counsellors.  I am also registered as a Hypnotherapist with the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council, a Member of the Institute of Brainworking Recursive Therapy and a Member of the British BrainWorking Research Society – of which I am a founder member.

Can you tell us a surprising fact about hypnosis?

The highly-focused state of hypnosis can be brought about by a swinging pocket-watch - although the well-known image of the swinging watch is mostly down to its use in movies.  This technique makes use of ‘eye-fixation’ -  the fixing of one’s eyes on a single point.  When the eyes follow the arc of a moving pendulum it is very different from the way our eyes usually move – which involves jerky movements.  These jerky ‘saccadic’ movements can be seen when we visually scan our environment and even when we read words on a page.  Following the smooth movement of an object (such as a pocket-watch) can induce a state of hypnosis.  Hypnotherapists always tell clients that ‘All hypnosis is self-hypnosis’ – in other words the client always has control.  Hypnotherapists merely assist and guide clients to change in the way that the client wants.