Andy Wayman BSc; DipSMRT

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Andy Wayman

Andy worked in the building services industry for many years but was always looking for a change to a more rewarding career in which he could help people. His interest in becoming a sports massage therapist grew from a time when he was continually suffering from running calf strains and had ongoing hip pain associated with long-distance driving.


Andy is a keen club runner and likes the challenge of long-distance running, so far he has tackled the London, Manchester, Brighton, Nottingham & Edinburgh marathons. He is also a member of a local tennis club and gym and enjoys playing golf and snowboarding.

He really enjoys working at charitable sporting events and providing post-event massages to people who have pushed themselves to their limits and sometimes beyond. Andy particularly enjoyed the buzz of massaging at the London Marathon.


Q&A with Andy Wayman

What are your qualifications?

I trained at the North London School of Sports Massage (NLSSM) gaining a BTEC Level 5 Professional Diploma in Sports Massage and Remedial Therapy. This qualification has given me the massage skills and abilities required to design and implement appropriate soft tissue treatment and rehabilitation plans.

Why do people come to you?

I tailor my massage treatment sessions and rehabilitation plans to each individual client depending on their presenting symptoms, pain patterns, postural issues, injuries etc. My priority as a massage therapist is to listen to every client’s story and their individual needs.

Sports massage is not just for people suffering from sports-related injuries, it can potentially help anybody with general aches and pains and a wide variety of complaints. 

I have a keen interest in identifying client’s postural issues and dealing with them as part of the massage treatment process, as this can help to ensure positive outcomes are long-lasting. In instances when clients are experiencing chronic pain, the most significant contributing factor can often be related to postural issues which may have been negatively affecting muscle function and tissue alignment for a long time.

As well as using general massage techniques to reduce tightness and tension in hypertonic muscles, I also utilise various techniques including Muscle Energy Techniques (MET) and Soft Tissue Release (STR) in order to stretch, lengthen and improve muscle function.  

Research shows that recovery from soft tissue injury is more successful when exercises and stretches are used in conjunction with massage therapy. I will always, if required provide clients appropriate exercises and/or stretches that can be performed between massage treatments.

What are the typical complaints your treatments can help with? 

Some typical complaints that receiving massage treatments can help with; neck and shoulder pain or stiffness, shoulder impingement and rotator cuff issues, tension headaches, back pain, muscle strains, tendonitis, tight or sore leg muscles (calves, hamstrings, quadriceps etc.) knee and hip pain. 

What complaints can you help with that many people find surprising?

The symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome can be significantly reduced with massage treatments and exercises focused on the shoulder complex, arms and wrists. Clients can see results after a couple of sessions, but it may take longer in combination with behaviour modification and home exercises to achieve lasting results.

Do you have any specialisms? 

I don’t have any specialisms, but as previously mentioned, I take a keen interest in the postural assessment of clients, as addressing and correcting postural issues as part of a treatment plan can have long-lasting benefits.

Can you tell us a surprising fact about Sports Massage?

Massage treatments can help with depression by reducing the amount of cortisol (the body’s response to stress) the body produces while increasing serotonin and dopamine production, which can help stabilize one’s mood. Massage also stimulates the release of endorphins, the body’s natural pain killers and feel-good chemicals.